JumpSend is a company that offers free marketing email lists and social media software programs to help internet marketers reach out to their target audience and drive targeted traffic to their websites. The business model seems to be fairly sound, as the company provides a money-back guarantee and people are able to purchase a lifetime membership for a price of $4.99 per month or less. I must admit that I had been a member of several other e-mail marketing programs, but have always found it difficult to get my e-mail marketing programs off the ground.

Then one day, I received an e-mail from a writer who seemed interested in interviewing me about my experience with the programs, which he hoped to write a new product around. Since I was very interested in this new market, I replied to his email immediately and agreed to the interview.

First I would like to state that the first day of being interviewed seemed to drag on. What was supposed to be a 30-minute interview in our office took us a full two hours. In addition, I did not feel comfortable being interviewed on the phone as the caller sounded very young and nervous.

It didn’t take long before we learned that the JumpSend business model involves selling memberships to individuals and has no way to determine if they actually have an interest in the product. We learned that there were paid surveys that members can join in exchange for a month’s worth of premium services that supposedly keep them coming back.

I contacted the writer by e-mail several times to ask him if he could give me a copy of his e-book, but he never responded. I was disappointed because the product was pretty impressive and I had worked with several other e-mail marketing programs.

Next, the writer asked me to give him a call and discuss the details of my offer. He did mention in the e-mail that he was a writer with an interesting concept and a marketable idea.

I wondered if the writer had some sort of ulterior motive. We ended up talking for quite some time and finally the writer said that he would gladly make an hour long recording of the interview available to anyone who bought the JumpSend program. I was very happy to see this because it shows that the writer is genuinely interested in helping other marketers to better understand how the product works.

In the recording, I showed him some of the design ideas that he and his colleagues had put together to create the right package for their products. In addition, I showed him a page from his website that displayed traffic to the products he sells. The writer asked me to look at this page and mentioned that he wanted to build a program around me.

I felt pretty nervous at this point because I was not yet familiar with the writer and I did not want to be associated with any new market. I felt that the JumpSend program seemed to be fairly straight forward in its operations. I decided to buy a subscription but still hesitated to buy the program due to my prior experience with other e-mail marketing programs.

In addition, the writer kept mentioning that the only way he could send me a check was if I referred one person to the program. As it turned out, he was referring an employee to the program and wanted me to help promote the program. I was a little taken aback because it seems like the original offer did not include referring anyone to the program.

Once the writing and audio production were completed, the writer asked me to post a YouTube video of myself answering some questions. He said that it would be great to bring my video out to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and all the other major social media sites. At first I thought he was just trying to bait me into buying a product, but then I realized that he may have actually had a vested interest in the outcome of the project. So, I agreed to make a video, which I did a few days later in which I discussed some more of the content of the program, which was unique and interesting. This allowed the writer to “play” along with the process and I was surprised at how easy it was to get on video. with someone in such a confined space as myself.